Vesica Piscis Birthing Of A New Souless Race

Published on 12 Jun 2018

When the Vesica Piscis is viewed horizontally, the mandorla becomes a different sort of passage: the birth passage. The pointed oval is a universal symbol of the Divine Feminine, and in this context the Vesica Piscis is the vulva of the Goddess, surrounded by the crescents of the waxing and waning moon.
The mandorla as birth passage can easily be seen on the sheila-na-gig figures found on Irish churches, and in the squatting figures of the Hindu goddess Kali. Almonds are a primeval fertility symbol, and as such are associated with the Phrygian goddess Cybele and her transgendered consort, Attis, and the Greek nymph Phyllis, who was metamorphosed into an almond tree.
Fish, too, play a significant part in the lives of goddesses from many cultures. “Delphos” translates from Greek as both “womb” and “dolphin.” The Chinese Great Mother Kwan -Yin often appears as a fish goddess, as does Aphrodite. Kali, as the swallower of Shiva’s male organ, becomes Minaksi, the fish-eyed one; Isis becomes Abtu, the Great Fish of the Abyss, when she swallows the male organ of Osiris.
“For God, who commanded the light to shine out of darkness, hath shined in our hearts, to give the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ.” 2 Corinthians 4:6, KJV
“Woe unto them that call evil good, and good evil; that put darkness for light, and light for darkness; that put bitter for sweet, and sweet for bitter!” Isaiah 5:20, KJV